Dec 6

Size Matters

Yes it does dear Reader. In many ways.
First of all, if you look at postage rates, you are charged more for large sizes, same weight, than for small sizes. Check with your PO to be sure you are getting the biggest bang for your buck.
From a Direct Mail perspective, you will make a larger impact with a larger sized mail piece. The trick is to go to the maximum size allowable at the lowest rate available.
A 6 x 9 envelope has 54 sq, inches of “real estate”; a #10 envelope has less than 40. That is definitely some extra room in which to state your case, front and back. More curb appeal, if you will…
Let’s face it, a lot of people, although they have to look at their mail, just look at the covers…they are judging your book by your cover. And deciding quickly - stay or go, open or toss…
Take advantage of that moment and that instant engagement; tease the offer, entice them with beauty, money, reward,right on the cover. Get them to go inside; that’s where the action is. Make that space work for you and grow your ROI.
Go big, or go home.
Michael

Nov 2
Dear Reader,

The most common complaint that I hear from the Direct Mail community is that there is a dearth of names and lists out there; there’s no one to mail to?

Well, hello, this is where the virtual world really (chuckle) comes into play, because building a relevant database has never been easier, has never been cheaper. Many companies can easily do this on their own, using just their own site.

“We’ll send you something free in the mail, just fill this out!” There you go, your own database complete with privacy issues addressed, and with a request for your information. Does it get much better than that?
 
That’s what I’m talking about. There’s no reason why you can’t harness the power of your own web site to spin and build your own current and qualified database. A database that you can well use for mail of all ilk, and that can be the cornerstone for your successful database marketing and direct marketing efforts.

Build it, and your mail audience will come.

Michael 


Oct 19

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Oct 5

Dear Reader,

A few e-mail tales have come to my attention recently.

The first was a million name e-mail blast that drew a total of 8 orders…

The second was an e-mailing of 5000 well targetted solicitations that drew neery a response…

The third was an important newsletter that was only opened by 12% of the recipients.

E-mail is so plentiful, so screened and often surprisingly inefficacious.

Now, I’m not one to say the world is flat, but the point is there are flatlands on the planet and regular mail is much better for many applications: it is real, it gets seen, it gets read if you send it to the right people.

Not so for e-mail; many have just too much of it and don’t actually have time to read anything but the most important that gets onto the screen.

Keep all of that in mind when you are planning your next campaign. For your best prospects, it makes sense to send them something real.

Really.

Michael


Sep 27

Dear Reader,
In round figures, the world’s postal adminstrations will deliver greater than 400 billion cards, letters, magazines and parcels this year. That’s more than one and a half billion pieces of mail delivered every day.
Mail is still large and is still relevant; it’s stuff you can touch and feel, and though it is under pressure it is still a big business.
This blog is here to look at all areas of mail, to shed light on opportunities, and provide information on a veritable postpourri of mail matters. This blog will also be an opportunity for me to learn more about the mail business from my readers; I welcome your comments.
I’ve been in the domestic and international mail business for more than 25 years, working for and with Postal Administrations, International Delivery Organizations and Mail Service Providers. The mail business is a constantly changing world, now more than ever because of:
-the touchy global financial situation
-climate change
-virtual competition
I look forward to blogging about the mail, and my next post will touch down on some basic green pointers.
Michael Hofmann